Semester Exam Schedule

Wednesday, May 23:   Social Studies (M) will take their semester exam on this day

Friday, May 25:  Social Studies (W) will take their semester exam on this day

 

Thursday, May 24 (6th and 7th only) Friday, May 25 (6th and 7th only)

8:00-8:40 (2ndperiod: M)8:45-9:25 (2nd period: W) 8:00-8:40 (1stperiod: M)8:45-9:25 (1st period: W)
9:30-9:35 (2ndperiod:MAttendance and announcements) 9:30-9:35 (2ndperiod:MAttendance and announcements)
9:40-10:20 (3rd period: M: 7thPE)10:25-11:05 (3rd period:W:7th PE-Adv.) 9:40-10:20 (4th period: M-6thBoys in PE/Girls in Band)10:25-11:05 (4th period:W-6th Girls in PE/Boys in Band)
11:05-11:30 Lunch (all staff on duty) 11:05-11:30 Lunch (all staff on duty)
11:30 Buses run (all staff on duty 11:30 Buses run (all staff on duty)

Thursday, May 24 (8th only) Friday, May 25 (8th only)

8:00-9:30 (2nd period) 8:00-9:30 (1st period)
9:30-9:35 (2nd period:M

Attendance and announcements)9:30-9:35 (2nd period:M

Attendance and announcements)9:40-10:20 (3rd period)9:40-10:20 (4th period)10:25-11:05 (5th period)10:25-11:05 (6th period)11:05-11:30 Lunch11:05-11:30 Lunch11:30 Buses run11:30 Buses run

 

Lesson Plans: April 30-May 4

The student understands individuals, issues, and events of the Civil War.

The student is expected to explain the roles played by significant individuals during the Civil War, including Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Abraham Lincoln, and heroes such as Congressional Medal of Honor recipients William Carney and Philip Bazaar;   Including Harrett Beecher Stowe Supporting Standard

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday:

Movie, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”

Thursday and Friday

The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology.
(29A)    The student is expected to differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software, databases, media and news services, biographies, interviews, and artifacts to acquire information about the United States;

Activities:

Timeline of events from 1400-1865.  Significance of those events related to today’s society.

Lesson Plans: April 16-20

Each day this week, we will review the TEKS in preparation for the STAAR test next week.

Second set of testing dates are as follows:   STAAR Test calendar:  Reading;   April 24:  6th and 7th grade Mathematics; April 25: 6th and 7th grade Reading;:  April 26:   8th grade Science; April 27:   8th grade Social Studies. 

Lesson Plans: April 9-13

(8.7) The student understands how political, economic, and social factors led to the growth of sectionalism and the Civil War. (8.8) The student understands individuals, issues, and events of the Civil War.

Monday and Tuesday:  (Today in 1865, the Civil War ended)

Objective: (8A)    The student is expected to explain the roles played by significant individuals during the Civil War, including Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, Robert E. Lee, and Abraham Lincoln, and heroes such as Congressional Medal of Honor recipients William Carney and Philip Bazaar; Supporting Standard (8.B)    The student is expected to explain the causes of the Civil War, including sectionalism, states’ rights, and slavery, and significant events of the Civil War, including the firing on Fort Sumter; the battles of Antietam, Gettysburg, and Vicksburg; the announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation; Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House; and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln;  Readiness Standard

Activities:   (Timeline/foldable:  Additions added during the study of the Civil War.  Advantages and Disadvantages for each side)

Homework:   Label and identify Northern and Southern States (Identifying Union states, Confederate states, border Union states, border Confederate states with separate colors)  Identify important individuals and their role during the Civil War.  (George McClellan, Abraham Lincoln, Ambrose Burnside, Robert E. Lee, Thomas Jackson,  Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, William Carney, Philip Bazaar, Dorothea Dix, Clara Barton, Sojourner Truth, George Pickett, George Meade, William Sherman, Phillip Sheridan, Frederick Douglass, Edwin Stanton, Sally Tompkins)

Wednesday and Thursday:

Objective:  (8.B)    The student is expected to explain the causes of the Civil War, including sectionalism, states’ rights, and slavery, and significant events of the Civil War, including the firing on Fort Sumter; the battles of Antietam, Gettysburg, and Vicksburg; the announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation; Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House; and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln;  Readiness Standard

Activities:  Check homework.  Identify important battles and their outcome during the Civil War.

(Bull Run, Monitor and Merrimack, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Shiloh, Ft. Wagner,  Vicksburg, Gettsburg, Pickett’s Charge, Atlanta, Petersburg, Wilderness)
Friday:

Continue with previous days objective and activities

Lesson Plans: April 2-6

(8.7) The student understands how political, economic, and social factors led to the growth of sectionalism and the Civil War.  (8.17)The student understands the dynamic nature of the powers of the national government and state governments in a federal system.

Monday and Tuesday:

Objectives:  Students will be able to analyze the impact of tariff policies on sections of the United States before the Civil War; Supporting Standard (8.7B)    compare the effects of political, economic, and social factors on slaves and free blacks; Supporting Standard (8.7C)    analyze the impact of slavery on different sections of the United States; Readiness Standard
Activities:   Class discussion on the purpose of the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850; why conflicts arose over the issue of slavery in western territories and how Uncle Tom’s Cabin affected attitudes toward slavery. Review for test

Wednesday and Thursday:

Test:   North and South:  1820-1850’s

Friday-  Good Friday (No school)

Lesson Plans: March 26-30

Monday:  Test Territorial Acquisitions

Tuesday and Wednesday:   STAAR Testing (Math and Reading)

The student understands the major reform movements of the 19th century.  The student understands how political, economic, and social factors led to the growth of sectionalism and the Civil War.
Thursday and Friday

Objective: (24A)    The student is expected to describe the historical development of the abolitionist movement. Supporting Standard (24B)    The student is expected to evaluate the impact of reform movements, including educational reform, temperance, the women’s rights movement, prison reform, abolition, the labor reform movement, and care of the disabled. Readiness Standard  as well as (25B) describe religious motivation for immigration and influence on social movements, including the impact of the first and second Great Awakenings; and Supporting Standard

Activity:   Chapter 15 Packet (Due the next class period)    Class discussion on reform movements then and now and its impact on society during the mid 1800s.

 

 

Lesson Plans: March 18-22

Chapter 13 Westward Expansion

The student understands westward expansion and its effects on the political, economic, and social development of the nation.  The student also understands the location and characteristics of places and regions of the United States, past and present.   The student understands the impact of religion on the American way of life.

Monday and Tuesday:  Objectives:   (8.6B) The student is expected to explain the political, economic, and social roots of Manifest Destiny; Readiness Standard  (8.10A)    The student is expected to locate places and regions of importance in the United States during the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries; Supporting Standard  (8.25A)   The student is expected to trace the development of religious freedom in the United States;  Supporting Standard

Activity:  Identify Manifest Destiny.   Chart (location, environment, people groups, reason for movement, life on the travels, hazards/hardships, important figures in the settlement, discoveries, mission endeavors)  the new territory settlers explored and the reason for such adventure. Examine the importance of each region.    Include, but do not be limited to, the Oregon Territory, Sierra Nevada,  Texas, the New Mexico Territory.  (Cause and Effect then and now)

Homework:  Pages 384 #1,2 ; 389 #1,2;  393 #1,2  (Due the next class meeting)
Wednesday and Thursday:  Objectives:   (8.6D)  The student is expected to explain the causes and effects of the U.S.-Mexican War and their impact on the United States; Readiness Standard  (8.25A)   The student is expected to trace the development of religious freedom in the United States;  Supporting Standard

Activity:  Examine conflicts with groups in the west and how war was looming for the United States with Mexico.  Compare/contrast this war with previous wars  (French and Indian, American Revolution, War of 1812)  and what role does the Monroe Doctrine play in this expansion.

Homework:  Pages 397 #1,2; 401 #1,2 (Due the next class meeting)

Lesson Plans: March 5-9

The student understands the challenges confronted by the government and its leaders in the early years of the republic and the Age of Jackson.

Monday/ Wednesday, Tuesday/Thursday:

Objective (5C) The Student is expected to explain the origin and development of American political parties;
Readiness Standard;   (5f) explain the impact of the election of Andrew Jackson, including expanded suffrage; Supporting Standard; (G) analyze the reasons for the removal and resettlement of Cherokee Indians during the Jacksonian era, including the Indian Removal Act, Worcester v. Georgia, and the Trail of Tears. Supporting Standard

Activities:   Packet activity will be given to the students and must be completed by the next day of class.  Students will be able to use the information from the packet on a short test.  (Wednesday or Thursday)

 

Lesson Plans: February 20-24

Monday:   No School (Presidents Day)

Tuesday and Wednesday:The student understands how various economic forces resulted in the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century. Science, technology, and society.   The student understands the impact of science and technology on the economic development of the United States.

Objective:  (27B)   The student is expected to identify the economic factors that brought about rapid industrialization and urbanization. Readiness Standard    Objective:   (27A)  The student is expected to explain the effects of technological and scientific innovations such as the steamboat, the cotton gin, and interchangeable parts; Readiness Standard   (27B)    analyze the impact of transportation and communication systems on the growth, development, and urbanization of the United States; Readiness Standard   (27C)    analyze how technological innovations changed the way goods were manufactured and marketed, nationally and internationally; Supporting Standard

Activities:  How did the Industrial Revolution of the 1800′s affect society then and how did the technology revolution affect society in the late 1900′s? Describe how settlers travel west and what improvements were made toward transportation.  PowerPoint Presentation due Thursday/Friday.

Thursday and Friday:  Government. The student understands the impact of landmark Supreme Court cases.
Objective:  (18A)    The student is expected toidentify the origin of judicial review and analyze examples of congressional and presidential responses; Readiness Standard
(18B)    summarize the issues, decisions, and significance of landmark Supreme Court cases, including Marbury v. Madison, McCulloch v. Maryland, and Gibbons v. Ogden; Supporting Standard

Activities:  Understand the rise of sectionalism, protective tariffs,  and how the Supreme Court expanded Federal power.

Test Monday/Tuesday over Chapter 11 (Only sections 1,2,3)

Lesson Plans: February 13-17

Monday:  Test Chapter 10

Tuesday and Wednesday:    Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of science and technology on the economic development of the United States.

Objective:   (27A)  The student is expected to explain the effects of technological and scientific innovations such as the steamboat, the cotton gin, and interchangeable parts; Readiness Standard
(27B)    analyze the impact of transportation and communication systems on the growth, development, and urbanization of the United States; Readiness Standard
(27C)    analyze how technological innovations changed the way goods were manufactured and marketed, nationally and internationally; Supporting Standard

Activities:  How did the Industrial Revolution of the 1800’s affect society then and how did the technology revolution affect society in the late 1900’s? Describe how settlers travel west and what improvements were made toward transportation.

Debate:  Factory workers vs. farmers and their livelihood.   Chart inventions then/now.   Compare and contrast similarities and differences.

Homework.  Chapter 11 page:  335 #1,2 ; 341 #1,2;  346  #1,2

 

Thursday and Friday:  Government. The student understands the impact of landmark Supreme Court cases.
Objective:  (18A)    The student is expected toidentify the origin of judicial review and analyze examples of congressional and presidential responses; Readiness Standard
(18B)    summarize the issues, decisions, and significance of landmark Supreme Court cases, including Marbury v. Madison, McCulloch v. Maryland, and Gibbons v. Ogden; Supporting Standard

Activities:  Understand the rise of sectionalism, protective tariffs,  and how the Supreme Court expanded Federal power.

Test Monday/Tuesday over Chapter 11 (Only sections 1,2,3)